Holiness: True Practical Holiness Part 2

3. Holiness and Sin a. Holiness does not destroy the presence of indwelling sin. But it does cause hatred toward it and a desire to be free from it. b. Sanctification is a progressive work and does not come to perfection all at once. c. Sanctification is an imperfect work. The best of men is a man at best. d. True holiness is a reality. It is something that can be seen, known and pointed out. If it exists it will be seen. e. We need to make allowances for backsliding. Every road has some twists and turns. But a person who willfully and unashamedly sins and willfully neglects what God says to do cannot be called holy. John Owen said, “I do not understand how a man can be a true believer unto whom sin is not the greatest burden, sorrow and trouble.” Why True, Practical Holiness Is So Important 1. Can holiness save us? Holiness cannot put away sin, cover iniquities, make satisfaction for transgression, or pay our debt to God. “Our best things are stained and tainted with imperfection. They are all more or less incomplete, wrong in the motive or defective in the performance. By the deeds of the law shall no child of Adam ever be justified.” 2. We must be holy because God commands it. 1 Thessalonians 4:3, “For this is the will of God, your sanctification.” 1 Peter 1:15-16, “but as he who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct, since it is written, “You shall be holy, for I am holy.” Matthew 5:48, “You therefore must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect.” 3. We must be holy because it is the end and purpose for which Christ came into the world. Jesus is a complete savior in that he not only to away the guilt of sin but the power. 2 Corinthians 5:15, “and he died for all, that those who live might no longer live for themselves but for him who for their sake died and was raised.” Ephesians 5:25-26, “Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her, that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word.”

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